Researchers create first of a kind quantum sensor that scans the entire RF spectrum

WHY THIS MATTERS IN BRIEF

The RF spectrum is huge, and it’s increasingly important in warfare and communications, now we have a single sensor that can scan it all and when combined with AI optimise it.

 

Love the Exponential Future? Join our XPotential Community, future proof yourself with courses from XPotential Universityconnect, watch a keynote, or browse my blog.

Quantum sensors are tiny, just atoms in size, and millions of times more sensitive than even today’s best sensor technologies, so much so that recently the UK’s Navy used them to develop the world’s first Quantum Compass that eliminates their reliance on global GPS satellites. Now in another development in the field, which could not only help optimise spectrum allocation for communications providers everywhere but also lead to a quantum leap in the development of new electronic warfare and jamming systems, a new quantum sensor could give soldiers a way to detect communication signals over the entire radio frequency spectrum, from 0 to 100 GHz, has been unveiled by researchers from the US Army.

Such wide spectral coverage by a single antenna is impossible with a traditional receiver system, and would require multiple systems of individual antennas, amplifiers and other components.

 

See also
New electronics breakthrough lets devices run for years without batteries

 

In 2018, Army scientists were the first in the world to create a quantum receiver that uses highly excited, super-sensitive atoms, known as Rydberg atoms, to detect communications signals, said David Meyer, a scientist at the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory.

The researchers calculated the receiver’s channel capacity, or rate of data transmission, based on fundamental principles, and then achieved that performance experimentally in their lab – improving on other groups’ results by orders of magnitude, Meyer said.

“These new sensors can be very small and virtually undetectable, giving Soldiers a disruptive advantage,” Meyer said. “Rydberg-atom based sensors have only recently been considered for general electric field sensing applications, including as a communications receiver. While Rydberg atoms are known to be broadly sensitive, a quantitative description of the sensitivity over the entire operational range has never been done.”

 

See also
The Pentagon hires the world's best poker playing AI to play War Games

 

To assess potential applications, Army scientists conducted an analysis of the Rydberg sensor’s sensitivity to oscillating electric fields over an enormous range of frequencies – from 0 to 1012 Hertz. The results show that the Rydberg sensor can reliably detect signals over the entire spectrum and compare favourably with other established electric field sensor technologies, such as electro-optic crystals and dipole antenna-coupled passive electronics.

“Quantum mechanics allows us to know the sensor calibration and ultimate performance to a very high degree, and it’s identical for every sensor,” Meyer said. “This result is an important step in determining how this system could be used in the field.”

This work supports the Army’s modernization priorities in next-generation computer networks and assured position, navigation and timing, as it could potentially influence novel communications concepts or approaches to detection of RF signals for geolocation.

 

See also
Xiaomi show off the world's first mass produced transparent television

 

In the future, Army scientists will investigate methods to continue to improve the sensitivity to detect even weaker signals and expand detection protocols for more complicated waveforms.

Related Posts

Leave a comment

Get the latest futuristic news delivered directly to your inbox!

Awesome! You're now subscribed.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This